Tag Archive for: 401k

Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

CalSaver’s Plan and Federal Plan Startup Tax Credit

 “A number of my business clients have been required to adopt the Calsaver’s plan for their employees. Now I see the SECURE Act 2.0 of 2022 sweetened the federal tax credit for plan startup costs for businesses with 50 or fewer employees. If a business has adopted the CalSaver’s plan is the plan startup tax credit still available to them?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business. A recent call with a financial advisor from California dealt with a question on CalSaver’s plan.

Highlights of Discussion
The good news is, “yes,” small business owners that adopted the CalSaver’s plan will still qualify for the federal plan startup tax credit if they want to upgrade from the CalSaver’s plan to a simplified employee pension (SEP), savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) or qualified plan (e.g., 401(k) plan) and they otherwise qualify for the tax credit (i.e., had 100 or fewer employees who received at least $5,000 in compensation for the preceding year; and had at least one plan participant who was a nonhighly compensated employee).

The federal plan startup credit under IRC Sec. 45E is not available if, during the three-taxable year period immediately preceding the first taxable year for which the credit would otherwise be allowed, the employer or any member of any controlled group including the employer (or any predecessor of either), established or maintained a “qualified employer plan” with respect to which contributions were made, or benefits accrued, for substantially the same employees as are in the new qualified employer plan. A CalSaver’s plan is a payroll deduction Roth IRA—completely employee funded. It is not considered a qualified retirement plan that would preclude a small employer from being eligible to claim the plan startup credit if the employer is otherwise eligible.

Section 102 of the SECURE Act 2.0 of 2022 (see page 819) increases the plan startup credit from 50 percent to 100 percent of eligible plan startup cost up to $5,000 for the first three years for employers with up to 50 employees. Prior rules still apply for those with 51-100 employees. What’s more, there is an additional credit available for defined contribution plans that is a percentage of employer contributions made for five years on behalf of employees, up to a per-employee cap of $1,000. The contribution credit is phased out for employers with between 51 and 100 employees.

Conclusion
A CalSaver’s plan is a payroll deduction Roth IRA—completely employee funded. It is not considered a qualified retirement plan that would preclude a small employer from being eligible to claim the federal plan startup credit if the employer is otherwise eligible and establishes a SEP, SIMPLE or qualified plan.

 

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

The Dos and Don’ts of Aggregating Required Minimum Distributions

“I have a 72-year-old client who is retired.  He has numerous retirement savings arrangements, including a Roth IRA, multiple traditional IRAs, a SEP IRA and a 401(k) plan. Can a distribution from his 401(k) plan satisfy all RMDs that he is obliged to take for the year?

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with an advisor in Minnesota is representative of a common question involving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from retirement plans.

Highlights of Discussion

No, your client may not use the RMD due from his 401(k) plan to satisfy the RMDs due from his IRAs (and vice versa). He must satisfy them independently from one another. Participants in retirement plans, such as 401(k), 457, defined contribution and defined benefit plans, are not allowed to aggregate their RMDs [Treasury Regulation 1.409(a)(9)-8, Q&A 1]. If an employee participates in more than one retirement plan, he or she must satisfy the RMD from each plan separately.

With respect to your client’s IRAs, however, there are special RMD “aggregation rules” that apply to individuals with multiple IRAs. Under the IRA RMD rules, IRA owners can independently calculate the RMDs that are due from each IRA they own directly (including savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE IRAs, simplified employee pension (SEP) IRAs and traditional IRAs), total the amounts, and take the aggregate RMD amount from an IRA (or IRAs) of their choosing that they own directly (Treasury Regulation 1.408-8, Q&A 9).

RMDs from inherited IRAs that an individual holds as a beneficiary of the same decedent may be distributed under these rules for aggregation, considering only those IRAs owned as a beneficiary of the same decedent.

Roth IRA owners are not subject to the RMD rules but, upon death, their beneficiaries would be required to commence RMDs. RMDs from inherited Roth IRAs that an individual holds as a beneficiary of the same decedent may be aggregated, considering only those inherited Roth IRAs owned as a beneficiary of the same decedent.

403(b) participants have RMD aggregation rules as well. A 403(b) plan participant must determine the RMD amount due from each 403(b) contract separately, but he or she may total the amounts and take the aggregate RMD amount from any one or more of the individual 403(b) contracts. However, only amounts in 403(b) contracts that an individual holds as an employee (and not a beneficiary) may be aggregated. Amounts in 403(b) contracts that an individual holds as a beneficiary of the same decedent may be aggregated [Treasury Regulation 1.403(b)-6(e)(7)].

Conclusion

In most cases, individuals who are over age 72 are required to take RMDs from their tax-favored retirement accounts on an annual basis. There is some ability to aggregate RMDs for IRAs and 403(b)s, but one must be careful to apply the rules for RMD aggregation correctly. Failure to take an RMD when required could subject the recipient to a sizeable penalty (i.e., 50 percent of the amount not taken).

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

Applying a QACA Election

“My client is implementing a QACA in her 401(k) plan. Does she have to apply the default election provision to all participants?”

Highlights of the Discussion

In general, according to IRS rules, your client would not have to apply the QACA default election to any employee who is eligible to participate in the 401(k) plan prior to the effective date of the QACA and has a previous salary deferral election in place or has affirmatively elected not to defer at all [ Treas. Reg. § 1.401(k)-3(j)(1)(iii)].

However, your client should check the terms of the plan document for the precise application of the default election. Sometimes a plan can be designed to apply the default election to those participants whose current deferral percentages are less than the QACA default deferral percentage.

Also, it could be possible for a plan to contain a provision where a participant’s current election expires after a set amount of time. In that case, the plan could then apply the QACA default percentage unless the affected participant executes another affirmative deferral election or opts out.

Conclusion

In a 401(k) plan with a QACA, there are exceptions to applying the QACA default deferral percentage. The best source to turn to is the plan document for the precise application of the QACA default election.

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

IRS as Creditor

Is the account balance of a 401(k) plan participant protected from an IRS tax levy?

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with an advisor in Alabama is representative of a common inquiry involving 401(k) plans and IRS tax levies.

Highlights of Discussion

Unfortunately, no it is not. If the participant has an unpaid tax liability the IRS has the authority to levy against his or her 401(k) plan account balance [ Reg. § 1.401(a)-13(b)(2)].  In fact, any qualified retirement plan or IRA [including traditional, Roth, savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) or simplified employee pension (SEP) plan IRAs] may be subject to an IRS tax levy.

11.6.3 of the IRS’s Internal Revenue Manual (IRM) provides instructions and strict procedures when an IRS tax levy involves assets in retirement plans (as opposed to retirement income under 5.11.6.2 of the IRM). The IRM instructs agents to levy on retirement accounts only after considering the following questions.

1) Does the taxpayer have property other than retirement assets that may be available for collection first?

2) Has the taxpayer exhibited “flagrant” conduct? (See example next.)

EXAMPLE:  Jake, who has an outstanding tax liability with the IRS, continues to make voluntary contributions to retirement accounts while asserting his inability to pay the amount he owes to the IRS.   The IRS could deem this conduct as flagrant.

3) Are the retirement plan assets  necessary to cover the tax payer’s essential living expenses?

4) Does the taxpayer have “present rights” to receive the retirement plan assets?

EXAMPLE:  Amanda has money in a 401(k) plan, but cannot withdraw it until she experiences a distribution triggering event as listed in the plan document. An IRS levy may identify her 401(k) plan balance, but the money cannot be paid over until Amanda can withdraw it under the terms of the plan.

Logistically, the IRS will use Form 668-R, Notice of Levy on Retirement Plans for levying retirement plan assets.  When money is withdrawn from a retirement account to satisfy an IRS levy the taxpayer would include any pre-tax amounts in his or her taxable income for the year. Fortunately, an exception to the 10% additional tax on early distributions for taxpayers under age 59 ½ applies if the money was withdrawn because of a notice of levy served on the retirement account.

Conclusion

In most cases, 401(k) plan assets are protected from creditors—unless the creditor is the IRS.  However, IRS agents are instructed to levy against retirement plan assets only as a last resort.  Any taxpayer addressing an IRS tax levy should seek guidance from an experienced tax professional or attorney experienced in this area.

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

“How is a lump-sum payout of unused vacation treated for plan purposes–is it compensation?”

How is a lump-sum payout of unused vacation treated for plan purposes–is it compensation?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare.  We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business. A recent call with an advisor in Massachusetts is representative of a common question compensation for plan purposes.

Highlights of Discussion

  • To answer this question, we need to consider two issues—ideally with the help of a tax advisor. First, how does the IRS treat a lump-sum payout of unused vacation for tax purposes and, second, what is the definition of compensation for plan purposes according to the governing plan document?
  • The following is not tax advice, but a general explanation of the rules based on IRS source materials. With respect to the first question, the IRS treats a lump-sum payout of unused vacation as “supplemental wages” subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes according to the IRS Publication 15, (Circular E), Employer’s Tax Guide. Any federal income tax withheld will be at the IRS supplemental wage tax rate, depending on whether the supplemental payment is identified as a separate payment from regular wages or combined with regular wages. (For more information, please see Publication 15 and Treasury Decision 9276.)
  • Regarding question number two, as supplemental wages, a lump-sum payout of unused vacation would be included in the definition of compensation for plan purposes—unless it is explicitly excluded under the terms of the plan document. Therefore, be sure to check the wording of the plan document carefully.

Conclusion

The IRS treats the lump-sum payout of unused vacation as supplemental wages for tax purposes. As supplemental wages, a lump-sum payout of unused vacation would be included in the definition of compensation for plan purposes—unless it is explicitly excluded under the terms of the plan document. For specific tax advice, please see the guidance of a tax professional.

 

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

Remember the Saver’s Tax Credit

“Can you remind me of the special tax credit available for individuals who make retirement savings contributions, please?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare.  We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with an advisor in Nevada is representative of a common inquiry regarding available tax credits for personal contributions to eligible plans.

Highlights of Discussion

Absolutely, after all, it is tax time! IRA owners, retirement plan participants (including self-employed individuals) and others may qualify for the IRS’s “Saver’s Credit” for certain contributions made to eligible savings arrangements. Details of the credit appear in IRS Publication 590-A and here Saver’s Credit.

The credit

  • Equals an amount up to 50%, 20% or 10% of eligible taxpayer contributions up to $2,000 ($4,000 if married filing jointly), depending on adjusted gross income (as reported on Form 1040, 1040SR or 1040NR);
  • Relates to contributions taxpayers make to their traditional and/or Roth IRAs, or elective deferrals to a 401(k) or similar workplace retirement plan (other plans qualify so see full list below); and
  • Is claimed by a taxpayer on Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions.

Contributors can claim the Saver’s Credit for personal contributions (including voluntary after-tax contributions) made to

  • A traditional or Roth IRA;
  • 401(k),
  • Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) IRA,
  • Salary Reduction Simplified Employee Pension (SARSEP),
  • 403(b),
  • Governmental 457(b),
  • Federal Thrift Savings Plan,
  • ABLE account* or
  • Tax-exempt, union pension benefit plan under IRC Sec. 501(c)(18)(D).

In general, the contribution tax credit is available to individuals who

1) Are age 18 or older;

2) Not a full-time student;

3) Not claimed as a dependent on another person’s return; and

4) Have income below a certain level (see table that follows).

* The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act of 2014 allows states to create tax-advantaged savings programs for eligible people with disabilities (designated beneficiaries). Funds from ABLE accounts can help designated beneficiaries pay for qualified disability expenses on a tax-free basis.

2021 Saver’s Credit Income Levels

Credit Rate Married Filing Jointly Head of Household All Other Filers*
50% of your contribution AGI not more than $39,500 AGI not more than $29,625 AGI not more than $19,750
20% of your contribution $39,501 – $43,000 $29,626 – $32,250 $19,751 – $21,500
10% of your contribution $43,001 – $66,000 $32,251 – $49,500 $21,501 – $33,000
0% of your contribution More than $66,000 More than $49,500 More than $33,000

*Single, married filing separately, or qualifying widow(er)

The IRS has a handy on-line “interview” that taxpayers may use to determine whether they are eligible for the credit.

Conclusion

Every deduction and tax credit counts these days. Many IRA owners and plan participants may be unaware of the retirement plan-related tax credits for which they may qualify.

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

“I’m confused about the deadlines for correcting 401(k) plan excesses. Can you give me quick tutorial?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare.  We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with an advisor in Minnesota is representative of a common inquiry regarding 401(k) plan nondiscrimination testing.

Highlights of Discussion

I’ll try my best to summarize, generally, but be sure to seek out tax and/or legal advice for actual plan situations. One of the characteristics that sets 401(k) plans apart from other defined contribution plans are the unique contribution limits that apply to employee salary deferrals and matching contributions, namely the actual deferral percentage (ADP) limit, the actual contribution percentage (ACP) limit, and the IRC Sec. 402(g) annual deferral limit.

I’ll cover the three following excesses in this space:

  1. ADP failures—where the highly compensated employees (HCEs) defer too much in relation to the nonHCEs and create “excess contributions” [IRC Sec. 401(k)(8)(b)]
  2. ACP failures—where matching and/or after-tax contributions are too high for HCEs in relation to those for nonHCEs and create “excess aggregate contributions” [IRC Sec. 401(m)(6)(B)]
  3. 402(g) failures—where plan participants, either HCEs or nonHCEs, defer above the annual limit and create “excess deferrals” [IRC Sec. 402(g)(3)]
401(k) Excess Correction Deadlines
Type of 401(k) Excess Time of Correction Consequences of Failing to Timely Correct
Excess Contributions (ADP test failure where HCEs defer too much compared to nonHCEs)

 

Or

 

Excess Aggregate Contributions (ACP test failure where HCEs’ matching and or after-tax contributions are too high compared to nonHCEs’)

 

Within 2½ months after plan year end (March 15th for a calendar year plan)

Issue corrective distributions to affected HCEs

 

 

 

Excess and earnings taxed in the year distributed

 

 

After 2 ½ months after plan year end

 

Two Corrective Options:

1. Issue corrective distributions to HCEs

or

2. Make a Qualified Nonelective Contribution/Qualified Matching Contribution to correct the failure

·     Excess and earnings taxed in the year distributed

·     Employer subject to a 10% penalty tax

After the end of the plan year following the year of the excess

 

·   Employer subject to a 10% penalty tax

·   Potential for plan disqualification

·   Correct through Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (EPCRS)

 

If “eligible automatic contribution arrangement” Excess Contribution or Excess Aggregate Contribution

 

6 months following the end of the plan year (June 30 for calendar year plan)

 

Issue corrective distributions to affected HCEs

 

Excess and earnings taxed in the year distributed
After 6 months following the end of the plan year

 

Two Corrective Options:

 

1. Issue corrective distributions to HCEs or

2. Make a Qualified Nonelective Contribution/Qualified Matching Contribution to correct the failure

·   Excess and earnings taxed in the year distributed

 

·   Employer subject to additional 10% penalty tax

 

After the end of the plan year following the year of excess (December 31 for calendar year plan)

 

·      Employer subject to additional 10% penalty tax

·      Potential for plan disqualification

·      Correct through EPCRS

 

Excess Deferrals (402(g) failure, Pre-Tax and Designated Roth) On or before April 15th of year after deferral

Issue corrective distributions of excess deferrals, plus their earnings

·      Excess deferral taxed as income in the year deferred.

·      Earnings on excess taxed in the year distributed.

After April 15 of year following excess

 

·   Excess deferral taxed in the year deferred.

·   Both the excess deferral and earnings taxed in the year removed.

·   If excess deferrals result from deferrals to one or more plans maintained by the same employer, possible loss of qualified plan status

 

Amounts in excess of any one of these limits could have serious consequences for the employer, the participant and/or the plan as a whole. Plan penalties are costly to plan sponsors and every effort should be made to avoid them. But worse than paying the IRS an extra penalty fee is the potential loss of qualified status for the 401(k) plan. If the IRS disqualifies a plan, the plan sponsor loses the tax-saving benefits of the plan, and the assets become immediately taxable to the participants. Therefore, such excesses must be avoided and timely corrected when failures occur.

Conclusion

Treasury regulations contain clear steps and deadlines by which plan sponsors must correct 401(k) excesses. If done so timely, the plan sponsor can avoid additional penalties and potential plan disqualification. Corrections made after the specified deadlines must follow the terms of the IRS’s EPCRS.

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

Remember Plan Tax Credits for 2021

“Can you remind me of the special tax credits available for small businesses who set up qualified retirement plans, please?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with a financial advisor from Arizona is representative of a common inquiry related to incentives for setting up retirement plans.

Highlights of Discussion

My pleasure! Small business owners (with fewer than 100 employees) are eligible for additional tax credits for setting-up retirement plans and/or adding an automatic enrollment feature. The credits are available if the owner establishes a 401(k), a SEP or a SIMPLE IRA plan. The business must

• Have had fewer than 100 employees who received at least $5,000 in compensation for the preceding year;
• Have at least one plan participant who was a nonhighly compensated employee; and
• Not have maintained a plan in the past.

The “Startup Credit” is up to $5,000 (a formula applies), available for the first three years the plan is in existence and offers real benefits to owners by freeing up tax dollars for other important business purposes. The credit was greatly improved as part of the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement of 2019 Act (SECURE Act), effective January 1, 2020 (increasing the maximum credit from $500 to $5,000). It is intended to encourage owners to establish retirement plans by helping make the plan more affordable during the startup process. In addition, the owners receive full tax deductions for all contributions made to the plan.

On top of that, if an owner elects to add an automatic enrollment feature to the plan, an additional $500 credit (for the first three years) is also available. The automatic enrollment feature calls for newly eligible participants to be enrolled automatically in the plan with a specified default deferral rate. The IRS provides additional details about the startup and auto deferral credits here.

Eligible businesses may claim the credit using Form 8881, Credit for Small Employer Pension Plan Startup Costs.

See the Instructions for Form 8881 for more details.

Conclusion
Tax credits for setting up a plan and having an automatic enrollment feature are great tools to help small businesses defray the initial costs of starting and maintaining a plan. Business owners should discuss the credits with their accountants and advisors to determine if it makes sense for them to establish a plan.

 

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
Print Friendly Version Print Friendly Version

Is Congress Closing the Backdoor to Roth IRAs?

An advisor asked: “Is Congress Closing the Backdoor to Roth IRAs?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center (RLC) Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs, qualified retirement plans and other types of retirement savings and income plans, including nonqualified plans, stock options, and Social Security and Medicare. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

A recent call with a financial advisor from California is representative of a common inquiry related to Roth conversions.

Highlights of the Discussion
Potentially, yes, as well as restricting other Roth conversion strategies. As part of the tentative measures to help fund the proposed $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package (a.k.a., Build Back Better Act ), the House Ways and Means Committee has suggested, among other tactics, restricting “back-door Roth IRAs,” a popular tax-reduction strategy where individuals convert traditional IRA and/or retirement plan assets to Roth IRAs. If enacted as proposed, after-tax IRA and after-tax 401(k) plan conversions would be eliminated after 12/31/2021. For amounts other-than after-tax (i.e., pretax assets), traditional IRA and plan conversions for taxpayers who earn over the following taxable income thresholds would cease after 12/31/2031:

• Single taxpayers (or taxpayers married filing separately) with AGI over $400,000,
• Married taxpayers filing jointly with AGI over $450,000, and
• Heads of households with AGI over $425,000 (all indexed for inflation).

The buildup of Roth assets can be a source of tax-free income later if certain conditions are met. Ending Roth conversions using after-tax contributions in a defined contribution plan or IRA, and restricting Roth conversions of pre-tax plan or IRA assets would materially limit many taxpayers’ ability to accumulate Roth assets in a tax-free or tax-reduced manner.
You won’t find the phrase backdoor Roth IRA in the Internal Revenue Code or Treasury regulations. Nor is it a specific product, but the industry has known about the phenomena for years. A backdoor Roth IRA is merely a series of transactions or steps an individual can take to have a Roth IRA—regardless of income level. While initially poorly understood and lacking clear IRS guidance, so called “back-door Roth IRAs” have been legitimized over the years by the IRS.

The ability to make a 2021 Roth IRA contribution is phased out and eliminated for single tax filers with income between $125,000-$140,000; and for joint tax filers with income between $198,000-$208,000. Consequently, if a person earns too much, he or she cannot make a Roth IRA contribution directly (i.e., through the front door). But many can still take another route—by converting traditional IRA or qualified retirement plan assets, a transaction that has become known as the backdoor Roth IRA.

Congress repealed any income limitations for Roth IRA conversions in 2010. Consequently, regardless of income level, anyone could fund a Roth IRA through a conversion. For example, if a person exceeds the income limitation for contributions to a Roth IRA, he or she could contribute amounts (deductible or nondeductible) to a traditional IRA based on earned income and, shortly thereafter, convert the contribution from the traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. Similarly, a person with a 401(k)-plan account balance could convert eligible plan assets either in-plan to a designated Roth account (if one exists) or out-of-plan to a Roth IRA through a plan distribution. Assets that are taxable at the point of conversion would be included in the individual’s taxable income for the year. Going forward, earnings would accumulate tax-deferred and, potentially, would be tax-free upon distribution from the Roth IRA. Under the authority of IRS Notice 2014-54, a qualified plan participant can rollover pre-tax assets to a traditional IRA for a tax-free rollover and direct any after-tax assets to a Roth IRA for a tax-free Roth conversion.

Conclusion
Plan participants and IRA owners need to be aware that as part of the 2021 budget reconciliation process, the ability to convert assets to Roth assets may be sunsetting. If revenue-generating provisions of the Build Back Better Act are enacted as currently proposed, Roth conversions of after-tax IRA and after-tax 401(k) plan assets would be eliminated after 12/31/2021; and Roth conversions of pre-tax IRA and plan assets would cease after 12/31/2031.

Click here for an RLC webinar on the proposed changes.

© Copyright 2023 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved