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Plan Participation and IRA Contributions

retirement pension

 Plan Participation and IRA Contributions

“A client of mine who participates in a 401(k) plan at work was told by his tax preparer that he cannot make an IRA contribution.  Is that correct?”

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs and qualified retirement plans. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

Deductibility of a 2016 traditional IRA contribution when the individual (or spouse) is covered by a workplace retirement plan

IF your filing
status is …
AND your modified adjusted gross income (modified AGI)
is …
THEN you can take …
single or
head of household
$61,000 or less a full deduction.
more than $61,000
but less than $71,000*
a partial deduction.
$71,000 or more no deduction.
married filing jointly or
qualifying widow(er)
$98,000 or less a full deduction.
more than $98,000
but less than $118,000**
a partial deduction.
$118,000 or more no deduction.
married filing separately2 less than $10,000 a partial deduction.
$10,000 or more no deduction.
Not covered by a plan, but married filing jointly with a spouse who is covered by a plan  $184,000 or less a full deduction.
more than $184,000
but less than $194,000***
a partial deduction.
Source:  IRS 2016 IRA Contribution and Deduction Limits [1] $194,000 or more no deduction.

*$62,000-$72,000 for 2017; **$99,000-$119,000 for 2017; and ***$186,000-$196,000 for 2017

 

Conclusion

If a person meets the age and income requirements for a year, he or she is eligible to make a traditional IRA contribution by the deadline.  But the tax deductibility of the contribution will be affected by participation in a workplace retirement plan, tax filing status and MAGI.