fiduciary
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Fiduciary Rule Transition

What New Disclosure is Required during the Fiduciary Rule Transition Period?

“Our firm will be following the Best Interest Contract Exemption (BICE) under the new investment advice fiduciary rules.  Our compliance department has provided a written notice of fiduciary status for us to use with our clients during the transition period that runs through December 31, 2017. Is this notice required?  

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs and qualified retirement plans. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

Highlights of Discussion

  • No, the written statement of fiduciary status is no longer required during the transition period. This is a recent change that was included in the regulation that delayed the applicability date of the new fiduciary rules to June 9, 2017 (DOL Reg. 2510.3-21).
  • The DOL changed the BICE and Principal Transaction Exemption transition period requirements, making adherence to the Impartial Conduct Standards1 during the transition period (June 9, 2017 through December 31, 2017) the only condition of compliance (removing the need to provide a written statement of fiduciary status as well as other requirements).
  • However, service providers to qualified plans may still be required to provide an updated service and fee disclosure under ERISA §408(b)(2) to reflect a change in fiduciary status as of June 9, 2017.
  • Pursuant to DOL Reg. § 2550.408b-2(c)(1)(iv), covered service providers to qualified retirement plans (e.g., 401(k) plans) who expect to receive at least $1,000 in direct or indirect compensation must provide plan fiduciaries with service and fee disclosures.  As part of the “408b-2” disclosure, service providers must include a statement of fiduciary status, if applicable [DOL Reg. § 2550.408b-2(c)(1)(iv)(B)].
  • Therefore, if a financial advisor’s status as a fiduciary to the plan changes as of the applicability date (June 9, 2017) of the investment advice fiduciary regulations, then he or she is required to provide an updated disclosure to the plan fiduciary reflecting the change in his or her fiduciary status.
  • The updated 408b-2 disclosure must be provided “as soon as practicable, but not later than 60 days from the date on which the covered service provider is informed of such change”  [DOL Reg. § 2550.408b-2(c)(1)(v)(B)]. Consequently, financial advisors should provide the notice by June 9, 2017 and no later than August 8, 2017.

 

Conclusion

Financial advisors should be aware that they may need to issue updated 408b-2 disclosures during the BICE and Principal Transaction Exemption transition period.

 

 

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© Copyright 2017 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
rules
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Definition of Disability for Early Distribution Penalty

 

What is the definition of disability for purposes of the early distribution penalty tax?

“How does the IRS define disability for the purposes of allowing a 401(k) plan participant to take a distribution before the age of 59 ½ without a penalty tax?”  

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs and qualified retirement plans. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

Highlights of Discussion

  • Generally, amounts an individual withdraws from an IRA or retirement plan before reaching age 59½ are called ”early” or ”premature” distributions. Beyond including the pretax portion of an early distribution in taxable income for the year taken, the recipient must pay an additional 10% early withdrawal penalty tax, unless an exception applies [Internal Revenue Code Section (IRC §) 72(t)].
  • There are several exceptions to the early withdrawal penalty tax found in IRC §72(t)(2)(A)-(G), including an exception for disability (IRC §72(t)(2)(A)(iii).
  • The IRS defines disability for this purpose in IRC §72(m)(7),  and the definition is quite strict:

 

“… an individual shall be considered to be disabled if he is unable to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to result in death or to be of long-continued and indefinite duration. An individual shall not be considered to be disabled unless he furnishes proof of the existence thereof …”

 

  • Some disabled individuals file IRS Schedule R, Credit for the Elderly or Disabled, with their IRS Form 1040s.  The schedule requires a physician’s certification that a person meets the IRC §72(m)(7) definition of disabled. Alternatively, a physician’s signed statement attesting to an individual’s permanent and total disability can serve as proof of the condition.
  • See the IRS’ Retirement Topics – Exceptions to Tax on Early Distributions for other penalty exceptions.
  • It is important that plan administrators review their disability claims procedures, including acceptable forms of documentation. While the final disability claims regulations and accompanying FAQs (in particular Q&A 9) reference the Social Security Administration or the employer’s long-term disability plan benefit awards as two examples of disability documentation, the rules for pension plans do not seem to preclude other forms, as long as the disability finding is made by a party other than the plan for purposes other than making a benefit determination under the plan. Here is the wording from Q&A 9 of the DOL’s FAQs

 

“However, if a plan provides a benefit the availability of which is conditioned on a finding of disability, and that finding is made by a party other than the plan for purposes other than making a benefit determination under the plan, then the special rules for disability claims need not be applied to a claim for such benefits.”

 

Conclusion

While disability can qualify a distribution recipient for an exception to the early withdrawal penalty tax, the definition of disability for this purpose is rigorous and requires proof.

 

 

© Copyright 2017 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved
403b plan
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Nonprofit with 401(k) and 403(b)

Can a 403(b) plan merge with a 401(k) plan?

“I have a tax-exempt client that currently offers a 401(k) plan. The group is taking over another IRC Sec. 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity that has a 403(b) plan.  Can the acquiring entity merge the 403(b) plan into the 401(k) plan?”  

ERISA consultants at the Retirement Learning Center Resource Desk regularly receive calls from financial advisors on a broad array of technical topics related to IRAs and qualified retirement plans. We bring Case of the Week to you to highlight the most relevant topics affecting your business.

Highlights of Discussion

  • No, generally the IRS does not allow mergers or transfers of assets between 403(b) and 401(k) plans [Treasury Regulation 1.403(b)-10(b)(1)(i)]. The IRS has stated in private letter rulings (PLRs) that if a 403(b) plan is merged with a plan that is qualified under IRC Sec. 401(a), the assets of the 403(b) plan will be taxable to the employees PLR 200317022.
  • One option would be to terminate the 403(b) plan, which would allow its participants to receive distributions (See the IRS’ Terminating a 403(b) Plan for more information).
  • The participants in the terminated 403(b) plan who receive eligible rollover distributions from the 403(b) plan would have the option to roll the amounts to the 401(k), provided the 401(k) plan permits rollover contributions (Revenue Ruling 2011-7 and IRS Rollover Chart.)

Conclusion

IRC Sec. 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entities have the ability to maintain both 401(k) and 403(b) plans independently. The IRS does not allow a sponsor to merge the two plan types, however.   A plan termination followed by participant rollovers may be a viable alternative to merging the plans.

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2017 Retirement Learning Center, all rights reserved